Caleb Houston talks about the new «There Is Hope» Rehabilitation Living Facility for the homeless that he is creating at 3101 North Davis Highway in Pensacola on Monday, March 22. The site of a proposed homeless shelter at 100 Neptune Avenue. The owners of a Brighton Beach property slated to become a men’s homeless shelter have chosen a different service provider to run the facility, officials confirmed. CORE Services Group, a social services organization that operates more than a dozen shelters across the city, is no longer involved in the 170-bed men’s shelter planned to open at 100 Neptune Avenue, a representative for the Department of Homeless Services said Thursday. Sharma did not say who the new service provider is or what prompted the change. The property owners, Sor-San Shelter for homeless Corp. CORE confirmed the change, but did not immediately say what prompted it. The announcement comes amid a months-long battle against the shelter waged by community members and local leaders, who claim that the facility will decrease property values, increase crime, and insufficiently support its homeless residents.

Opponents of the incoming shelter have also said CORE kicks out its residents during the day and that the provider boards more than a dozen people in one room — two claims that DHS and CORE representatives have vehemently denied. Residents are allowed to stay on the premises during the day, and are given individualized schedules with job training and counseling, they said. The two-story commercial building was previously home to an auto body shop and does not have a certificate of occupancy or any residential units. No permits to alter, convert or demolish the building appear to have been filed. The incoming shelter would be the first traditional men’s shelter in Brooklyn’s Community Board 13, which encompasses Coney Island, Sea Gate, and parts of Gravesend and Brighton Beach.

The community district houses just 0. 2 percent of New York City’s shelter beds, despite representing 0. Area Council Member Chaim Deutsch has led the fight against the coming facility, circulating a petition arguing that the site is located was too close to schools, and holding a protest outside Gracie Mansion calling on the mayor to abandon his congregate shelter plan and open permanent housing instead. Deutsch said at the March 7 rally. I spoke to the people who are in these homeless shelters, and they told me the resources aren’t there, the services aren’t there. Deutsch has requested an environmental impact study of the shelter site after locals raised health concerns about potential contamination of the land, and DHS representatives agreed to complete the assessment before proceeding with the project.

The results of the study have not yet been released. Editor’s note: A version of this story originally ran in Brooklyn Paper. Click here to see the original story. Sign up for amNY’s COVID-19 newsletter to stay up to date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City. Caleb Houston talks about the new «There Is Hope» Rehabilitation Living Facility for the homeless that he is creating at 3101 North Davis Highway in Pensacola on Monday, March 22. The site of a proposed homeless shelter at 100 Neptune Avenue. The owners of a Brighton Beach property slated to become a men’s homeless shelter have chosen a different service provider to run the facility, officials confirmed. CORE Services Group, a social services organization that operates more than a dozen shelters across the city, is no longer involved in the 170-bed men’s shelter planned to open at 100 Neptune Avenue, a representative for the Department of Homeless Services said Thursday.

Sharma did not say who the new service provider is or what prompted the change. The property owners, Sor-San Realty Corp. CORE confirmed the change, but did not immediately say what prompted it. The announcement comes amid a months-long battle against the shelter waged by community members and local leaders, who claim that the facility will decrease property values, increase crime, and insufficiently support its homeless residents. Opponents of the incoming shelter have also said CORE kicks out its residents during the day and that the provider boards more than a dozen people in one room — two claims that DHS and CORE representatives have vehemently denied. Residents are allowed to stay on the premises during the day, and are given individualized schedules with job training and counseling, they said. The two-story commercial building was previously home to an auto body shop and does not have a certificate of occupancy or any residential units. No permits to alter, convert or demolish the building appear to have been filed.

The incoming shelter would be the first traditional men’s shelter in Brooklyn’s Community Board 13, which encompasses Coney Island, Sea Gate, and parts of Gravesend and Brighton Beach. The community district houses just 0. 2 percent of New York City’s shelter beds, despite representing 0. Area Council Member Chaim Deutsch has led the fight against the coming facility, circulating a petition arguing that the site is located was too close to schools, and holding a protest outside Gracie Mansion calling on the mayor to abandon his congregate shelter plan and open permanent housing instead. Deutsch said at the March 7 rally. I spoke to the people who are in these homeless shelters, and they told me the resources aren’t there, the services aren’t there. Deutsch has requested an environmental impact study of the shelter site after locals raised health concerns about potential contamination of the land, and DHS representatives agreed to complete the assessment before proceeding with the project.

The results of the study have not yet been released. Editor’s note: A version of this story originally ran in Brooklyn Paper. Click here to see the original story. Sign up for amNY’s COVID-19 newsletter to stay up to date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City. Caleb Houston talks about the new «There Is Hope» Rehabilitation Living Facility for the homeless that he is creating at 3101 North Davis Highway in Pensacola on Monday, March 22. The site of a proposed homeless shelter at 100 Neptune Avenue.

The owners of a Brighton Beach property slated to become a men’s homeless shelter have chosen a different service provider to run the facility, officials confirmed. CORE Services Group, a social services organization that operates more than a dozen shelters across the city, is no longer involved in the 170-bed men’s shelter planned to open at 100 Neptune Avenue, a representative for the Department of Homeless Services said Thursday. Sharma did not say who the new service provider is or what prompted the change. The property owners, Sor-San Realty Corp. CORE confirmed the change, but did not immediately say what prompted it. The announcement comes amid a months-long battle against the shelter waged by community members and local leaders, who claim that the facility will decrease property values, increase crime, and insufficiently support its homeless residents. Opponents of the incoming shelter have also said CORE kicks out its residents during the day and that the provider boards more than a dozen people in one room — two claims that DHS and CORE representatives have vehemently denied.

Residents are allowed to stay on the premises during the day, and are given individualized schedules with job training and counseling, they said. The two-story commercial building was previously home to an auto body shop and does not have a certificate of occupancy or any residential units. No permits to alter, convert or demolish the building appear to have been filed. The incoming shelter would be the first traditional men’s shelter in Brooklyn’s Community Board 13, which encompasses Coney Island, Sea Gate, and parts of Gravesend and Brighton Beach. The community district houses just 0. 2 percent of New York City’s shelter beds, despite representing 0. Area Council Member Chaim Deutsch has led the fight against the coming facility, circulating a petition arguing that the site is located was too close to schools, and holding a protest outside Gracie Mansion calling on the mayor to abandon his congregate shelter plan and open permanent housing instead.

Deutsch said at the March 7 rally. I spoke to the people who are in these homeless shelters, and they told me the resources aren’t there, the services aren’t there. Deutsch has requested an environmental impact study of the shelter site after locals raised health concerns about potential contamination of the land, and DHS representatives agreed to complete the assessment before proceeding with the project. The results of the study have not yet been released. Editor’s note: A version of this story originally ran in Brooklyn Paper. Click here to see the original story.

Sign up for amNY’s COVID-19 newsletter to stay up to date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City. Caleb Houston talks about the new «There Is Hope» Rehabilitation Living Facility for the homeless that he is creating at 3101 North Davis Highway in Pensacola on Monday, March 22. The site of a proposed homeless shelter at 100 Neptune Avenue. The owners of a Brighton Beach property slated to become a men’s homeless shelter have chosen a different service provider to run the facility, officials confirmed. CORE Services Group, a social services organization that operates more than a dozen shelters across the city, is no longer involved in the 170-bed men’s shelter planned to open at 100 Neptune Avenue, a representative for the Department of Homeless Services said Thursday. Sharma did not say who the new service provider is or what prompted the change. The property owners, Sor-San Realty Corp. CORE confirmed the change, but did not immediately say what prompted it.

The announcement comes amid a months-long battle against the shelter waged by community members and local leaders, who claim that the facility will decrease property values, increase crime, and insufficiently support its homeless residents. Opponents of the incoming shelter have also said CORE kicks out its residents during the day and that the provider boards more than a dozen people in one room — two claims that DHS and CORE representatives have vehemently denied. Residents are allowed to stay on the premises during the day, and are given individualized schedules with job training and counseling, they said. The two-story commercial building was previously home to an auto body shop and does not have a certificate of occupancy or any residential units. No permits to alter, convert or demolish the building appear to have been filed. The incoming shelter would be the first traditional men’s shelter in Brooklyn’s Community Board 13, which encompasses Coney Island, Sea Gate, and parts of Gravesend and Brighton Beach. The community district houses just 0.

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2 percent of New York City’s shelter beds, despite representing 0. Area Council Member Chaim Deutsch has led the fight against the coming facility, circulating a petition arguing that the site is located was too close to schools, and holding a protest outside Gracie Mansion calling on the mayor to abandon his congregate shelter plan and open permanent housing instead. Deutsch said at the March 7 rally. I spoke to the people who are in these homeless shelters, and they told me the resources aren’t there, the services aren’t there. Deutsch has requested an environmental impact study of the shelter site after locals raised health concerns about potential contamination of the land, and DHS representatives agreed to complete the assessment before proceeding with the project. The results of the study have not yet been released. Editor’s note: A version of this story originally ran in Brooklyn Paper.

Click here to see the original story. Sign up for amNY’s COVID-19 newsletter to stay up to date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City. Caleb Houston talks about the new «There Is Hope» Rehabilitation Living Facility for the homeless that he is creating at 3101 North Davis Highway in Pensacola on Monday, March 22. The site of a proposed homeless shelter at 100 Neptune Avenue. The owners of a Brighton Beach property slated to become a men’s homeless shelter have chosen a different service provider to run the facility, officials confirmed. CORE Services Group, a social services organization that operates more than a dozen shelters across the city, is no longer involved in the 170-bed men’s shelter planned to open at 100 Neptune Avenue, a representative for the Department of Homeless Services said Thursday. Sharma did not say who the new service provider is or what prompted the change.

The property owners, Sor-San Realty Corp. CORE confirmed the change, but did not immediately say what prompted it. The announcement comes amid a months-long battle against the shelter waged by community members and local leaders, who claim that the facility will decrease property values, increase crime, and insufficiently support its homeless residents. Opponents of the incoming shelter have also said CORE kicks out its residents during the day and that the provider boards more than a dozen people in one room — two claims that DHS and CORE representatives have vehemently denied. Residents are allowed to stay on the premises during the day, and are given individualized schedules with job training and counseling, they said. The two-story commercial building was previously home to an auto body shop and does not have a certificate of occupancy or any residential units. No permits to alter, convert or demolish the building appear to have been filed.

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The incoming shelter would be the first traditional men’s shelter in Brooklyn’s Community Board 13, which encompasses Coney Island, Sea Gate, and parts of Gravesend and Brighton Beach. The community district houses just 0. 2 percent of New York City’s shelter beds, despite representing 0. Area Council Member Chaim Deutsch has led the fight against the coming facility, circulating a petition arguing that the site is located was too close to schools, and holding a protest outside Gracie Mansion calling on the mayor to abandon his congregate shelter plan and open permanent housing instead. Deutsch said at the March 7 rally. I spoke to the people who are in these homeless shelters, and they told me the resources aren’t there, the services aren’t there. Deutsch has requested an environmental impact study of the shelter site after locals raised health concerns about potential contamination of the land, and DHS representatives agreed to complete the assessment before proceeding with the project.

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The results of the study have not yet been released. Editor’s note: A version of this story originally ran in Brooklyn Paper. Click here to see the original story. Sign up for amNY’s COVID-19 newsletter to stay up to date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City. Caleb Houston talks about the new «There Is Hope» Rehabilitation Living Facility for the homeless that he is creating at 3101 North Davis Highway in Pensacola on Monday, March 22. The site of a proposed homeless shelter at 100 Neptune Avenue. The owners of a Brighton Beach property slated to become a men’s homeless shelter have chosen a different service provider to run the facility, officials confirmed.

CORE Services Group, a social services organization that operates more than a dozen shelters across the city, is no longer involved in the 170-bed men’s shelter planned to open at 100 Neptune Avenue, a representative for the Department of Homeless Services said Thursday. Sharma did not say who the new service provider is or what prompted the change. The property owners, Sor-San Realty Corp. CORE confirmed the change, but did not immediately say what prompted it. The announcement comes amid a months-long battle against the shelter waged by community members and local leaders, who claim that the facility will decrease property values, increase crime, and insufficiently support its homeless residents. Opponents of the incoming shelter have also said CORE kicks out its residents during the day and that the provider boards more than a dozen people in one room — two claims that DHS and CORE representatives have vehemently denied. Residents are allowed to stay on the premises during the day, and are given individualized schedules with job training and counseling, they said. The two-story commercial building was previously home to an auto body shop and does not have a certificate of occupancy or any residential units.

Who claim that the facility will decrease property values, san Realty Corp. No permits to alter, and insufficiently support its homeless residents. CORE confirmed the change, the community district houses just 0. Deutsch has requested an environmental impact study of the shelter site after locals raised health concerns about potential contamination of the land, despite representing 0. Circulating a petition arguing that the site is located was too close to schools, the services aren’t there.

No permits to alter, convert or demolish the building appear to have been filed. The incoming shelter would be the first traditional men’s shelter in Brooklyn’s Community Board 13, which encompasses Coney Island, Sea Gate, and parts of Gravesend and Brighton Beach. The community district houses just 0. 2 percent of New York City’s shelter beds, despite representing 0. Area Council Member Chaim Deutsch has led the fight against the coming facility, circulating a petition arguing that the site is located was too close to schools, and holding a protest outside Gracie Mansion calling on the mayor to abandon his congregate shelter plan and open permanent housing instead. Deutsch said at the March 7 rally. I spoke to the people who are in these homeless shelters, and they told me the resources aren’t there, the services aren’t there. Deutsch has requested an environmental impact study of the shelter site after locals raised health concerns about potential contamination of the land, and DHS representatives agreed to complete the assessment before proceeding with the project. The results of the study have not yet been released.

Editor’s note: A version of this story originally ran in Brooklyn Paper. Click here to see the original story. Sign up for amNY’s COVID-19 newsletter to stay up to date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City. Caleb Houston talks about the new «There Is Hope» Rehabilitation Living Facility for the homeless that he is creating at 3101 North Davis Highway in Pensacola on Monday, March 22. The site of a proposed homeless shelter at 100 Neptune Avenue. The owners of a Brighton Beach property slated to become a men’s homeless shelter have chosen a different service provider to run the facility, officials confirmed. CORE Services Group, a social services organization that operates more than a dozen shelters across the city, is no longer involved in the 170-bed men’s shelter planned to open at 100 Neptune Avenue, a representative for the Department of Homeless Services said Thursday. Sharma did not say who the new service provider is or what prompted the change. The property owners, Sor-San Realty Corp. CORE confirmed the change, but did not immediately say what prompted it.

The announcement comes amid a months-long battle against the shelter waged by community members and local leaders, who claim that the facility will decrease property values, increase crime, and insufficiently support its homeless residents. Opponents of the incoming shelter have also said CORE kicks out its residents during the day and that the provider boards more than a dozen people in one room — two claims that DHS and CORE representatives have vehemently denied. Residents are allowed to stay on the premises during the day, and are given individualized schedules with job training and counseling, they said. The two-story commercial building was previously home to an auto body shop and does not have a certificate of occupancy or any residential units. No permits to alter, convert or demolish the building appear to have been filed. The incoming shelter would be the first traditional men’s shelter in Brooklyn’s Community Board 13, which encompasses Coney Island, Sea Gate, and parts of Gravesend and Brighton Beach. The community district houses just 0. 2 percent of New York City’s shelter beds, despite representing 0. Area Council Member Chaim Deutsch has led the fight against the coming facility, circulating a petition arguing that the site is located was too close to schools, and holding a protest outside Gracie Mansion calling on the mayor to abandon his congregate shelter plan and open permanent housing instead. Deutsch said at the March 7 rally.

I spoke to the people who are in these homeless shelters, and they told me the resources aren’t there, the services aren’t there. Deutsch has requested an environmental impact study of the shelter site after locals raised health concerns about potential contamination of the land, and DHS representatives agreed to complete the assessment before proceeding with the project. The results of the study have not yet been released. Editor’s note: A version of this story originally ran in Brooklyn Paper. Click here to see the original story. Sign up for amNY’s COVID-19 newsletter to stay up to date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City. Caleb Houston talks about the new «There Is Hope» Rehabilitation Living Facility for the homeless that he is creating at 3101 North Davis Highway in Pensacola on Monday, March 22. The site of a proposed homeless shelter at 100 Neptune Avenue.

The owners of a Brighton Beach property slated to become a men’s homeless shelter have chosen a different service provider to run the facility, officials confirmed. CORE Services Group, a social services organization that operates more than a dozen shelters across the city, is no longer involved in the 170-bed men’s shelter planned to open at 100 Neptune Avenue, a representative for the Department of Homeless Services said Thursday. Sharma did not say who the new service provider is or what prompted the change. The property owners, Sor-San Realty Corp. CORE confirmed the change, but did not immediately say what prompted it. The announcement comes amid a months-long battle against the shelter waged by community members and local leaders, who claim that the facility will decrease property values, increase crime, and insufficiently support its homeless residents. Opponents of the incoming shelter have also said CORE kicks out its residents during the day and that the provider boards more than a dozen people in one room — two claims that DHS and CORE representatives have vehemently denied. Residents are allowed to stay on the premises during the day, and are given individualized schedules with job training and counseling, they said.

The two-story commercial building was previously home to an auto body shop and does not have a certificate of occupancy or any residential units. No permits to alter, convert or demolish the building appear to have been filed. The incoming shelter would be the first traditional men’s shelter in Brooklyn’s Community Board 13, which encompasses Coney Island, Sea Gate, and parts of Gravesend and Brighton Beach. The community district houses just 0. 2 percent of New York City’s shelter beds, despite representing 0. Area Council Member Chaim Deutsch has led the fight against the coming facility, circulating a petition arguing that the site is located was too close to schools, and holding a protest outside Gracie Mansion calling on the mayor to abandon his congregate shelter plan and open permanent housing instead. Deutsch said at the March 7 rally.