Jump to navigation Jump to musical theatre tickets This article is about traditional Western musical theatre. For the film genre, see Musical film. For the music genre, see Comedy music. The Black Crook was a hit musical in 1866. Musical theatre is a form of theatrical performance that combines songs, spoken dialogue, acting and dance. Although music has been a part of dramatic presentations since ancient times, modern Western musical theatre emerged during the 19th century, with many structural elements established by the works of Gilbert and Sullivan in Britain and those of Harrigan and Hart in America. Musicals are performed around the world.

They may be presented in large venues, such as big-budget Broadway or West End productions in New York City or London. Since the 20th century, the «book musical» has been defined as a musical play where songs and dances are fully integrated into a well-made story with serious dramatic goals that is able to evoke genuine emotions other than laughter. There is no fixed length for a musical. Musicals are usually presented in two acts, with one short intermission, and the first act is frequently longer than the second. Moments of greatest dramatic intensity in a book musical are often performed in song.

Musical theatre is closely related to the theatrical form of opera, but the two are usually distinguished by weighing a number of factors. First, musicals generally have a greater focus on spoken dialogue. Finally, musicals usually avoid certain operatic conventions. In particular, a musical is almost always performed in the language of its audience. Musicals produced on Broadway or in the West End, for instance, are invariably sung in English, even if they were originally written in another language. Like opera, the singing in musical theatre is generally accompanied by an instrumental ensemble called a pit orchestra, located in a lowered area in front of the stage.

Shorter or simplified «junior» versions of many musicals are available for schools and youth groups, and very short works created or adapted for performance by children are sometimes called minimusicals. The antecedents of musical theatre in Europe can be traced back to the theatre of ancient Greece, where music and dance were included in stage comedies and tragedies during the 5th century BCE. The music from the ancient forms is lost, however, and they had little influence on later development of musical theatre. The European Renaissance saw older forms evolve into two antecedents of musical theatre: commedia dell’arte, where raucous clowns improvised familiar stories, and later, opera buffa. Colonial America did not have a significant theatre presence until 1752, when London entrepreneur William Hallam sent a company of actors to the colonies managed by his brother Lewis. In New York in the summer of 1753, they performed ballad-operas, such as The Beggar’s Opera, and ballad-farces. Around 1850, the French composer Hervé was experimenting with a form of comic musical theatre he called opérette.

In America, mid-19th century musical theatre entertainments included crude variety revue, which eventually developed into vaudeville, minstrel shows, which soon crossed the Atlantic to Britain, and Victorian burlesque, first popularized in the US by British troupes. As transportation improved, poverty in London and New York diminished, and street lighting made for safer travel at night, the number of patrons for the growing number of theatres increased enormously. Plays ran longer, leading to better profits and improved production values, and men began to bring their families to the theatre. 657 performances, but New York runs continued to be relatively short, with a few exceptions, compared with London runs, until the 1920s. Meanwhile, musicals took over the London stage in the Gay Nineties, led by producer George Edwardes, who perceived that audiences wanted a new alternative to the Savoy-style comic operas and their intellectual, political, absurdist satire. American musical to run for over a year in London. Virtually eliminated from the English-speaking stage by competition from the ubiquitous Edwardian musical comedies, operettas returned to London and Broadway in 1907 with The Merry Widow, and adaptations of continental operettas became direct competitors with musicals. In the 1910s, the team of P.

These shows built and polished the mold from which almost all later major musical comedies evolved. The characters and situations were, within the limitations of musical comedy license, believable and the humor came from the situations or the nature of the characters. Kern’s exquisitely flowing melodies were employed to further the action or develop characterization. The theatre-going public needed escapist entertainment during the dark times of World War I, and they flocked to the theatre. The 1919 hit musical Irene ran for 670 performances, a Broadway record that held until 1938. The musicals of the Roaring Twenties, borrowing from vaudeville, music hall and other light entertainments, tended to emphasize big dance routines and popular songs at the expense of plot. Princess Theatre musicals, with dramatic themes told through the music, dialogue, setting and movement. As the Great Depression set in during the post-Broadway national tour of Show Boat, the public turned back to mostly light, escapist song-and-dance entertainment.

Gershwins, was the first musical awarded the Pulitzer Prize. The motion picture mounted a challenge to the stage. Silent films had presented only limited competition, but by the end of the 1920s, films like The Jazz Singer could be presented with synchronized sound. Talkie» films at low prices effectively killed off vaudeville by the early 1930s. The 1940s would begin with more hits from Porter, Irving Berlin, Rodgers and Hart, Weill and Gershwin, some with runs over 500 performances as the economy rebounded, but artistic change was in the air. Rodgers and Hammerstein were the most important contributors to the musical-play form The examples they set in creating vital plays, often rich with social thought, provided the necessary encouragement for other gifted writers to create musical plays of their own». The show’s creativity stimulated Rodgers and Hammerstein’s contemporaries and ushered in the «Golden Age» of American musical theatre.

Americana was displayed on Broadway during the «Golden Age», as the wartime cycle of shows began to arrive. The 1950s were crucial to the development of the American musical. Another record was set by The Threepenny Opera, which ran for 2,707 performances, becoming the longest-running off-Broadway musical until The Fantasticks. The production also broke ground by showing that musicals could be profitable off-Broadway in a small-scale, small orchestra format. Romeo and Juliet to modern day New York City and converted the feuding Montague and Capulet families into opposing ethnic gangs, the Jets and the Sharks. Although directors and choreographers have had a major influence on musical theatre style since at least the 19th century, George Abbott and his collaborators and successors took a central role in integrating movement and dance fully into musical theatre productions in the Golden Age.

During the Golden Age, automotive companies and other large corporations began to hire Broadway talent to write corporate musicals, private shows only seen by their employees or customers. In 1960, The Fantasticks was first produced off-Broadway. This intimate allegorical show would quietly run for over 40 years at the Sullivan Street Theatre in Greenwich Village, becoming by far the longest-running musical in history. While some critics have argued that some of Sondheim’s musicals lack commercial appeal, others have praised their lyrical sophistication and musical complexity, as well as the interplay of lyrics and music in his shows. Israel, and continuing with the blockbuster hits Hello, Dolly! The musical started to diverge from the relatively narrow confines of the 1950s. Rock music would be used in several Broadway musicals, beginning with Hair, which featured not only rock music but also nudity and controversial opinions about the Vietnam War, race relations and other social issues.

Tolerance as an important theme in musicals has continued in recent decades. The final expression of West Side Story left a message of racial tolerance. By the end of the 1960s, musicals became racially integrated, with black and white cast members even covering each other’s roles, as they did in Hair. From hundreds of hours of tapes, James Kirkwood Jr. Broadway audiences welcomed musicals that varied from the golden age style and substance. The 1980s saw the influence of European «megamusicals» on Broadway, in the West End and elsewhere. The megamusicals’ huge budgets redefined expectations for financial success on Broadway and in the West End.

In earlier years, it was possible for a show to be considered a hit after a run of several hundred performances, but with multimillion-dollar production costs, a show must run for years simply to turn a profit. Megamusicals were also reproduced in productions around the world, multiplying their profit potential while expanding the global audience for musical theatre. The 1990s also saw the influence of large corporations on the production of musicals. In the new century, familiarity has been embraced by producers and investors anxious to guarantee that they recoup their considerable investments. Today, it is less likely that a sole producer, such as David Merrick or Cameron Mackintosh, backs a production. Several musicals returned to the spectacle format that was so successful in the 1980s, recalling extravaganzas that have been presented at times, throughout theatre history, since the ancient Romans staged mock sea battles. In 2013, Cyndi Lauper was the «first female composer to win the Best Score without a male collaborator» for writing the music and lyrics for Kinky Boots.

Another trend has been to create a minimal plot to fit a collection of songs that have already been hits. Victoria, Little Shop of Horrors and the 1996 film of Evita. In 2013, NBC began a series of live television broadcasts of musicals with The Sound of Music Live! Although the production received mixed reviews, it was a ratings success. Some television shows have set episodes as a musical. There have also been musicals made for the internet, including Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog, about a low-rent super-villain played by Neil Patrick Harris. However, the light musical stage in other countries has become more active in recent decades.

Japan has recently seen the growth of an indigenous form of musical theatre, both animated and live action, mostly based on Anime and Manga, such as Kiki’s Delivery Service and Tenimyu. Beginning with a 2002 tour of Les Misérables, various Western musicals have been imported to mainland China and staged in English. Musicals are often presented by amateur and school groups in churches, schools and other performance spaces. 27 million tickets were purchased for Broadway shows for a gross sale amount of almost a billion dollars. The musical has been changing ever since Offenbach did his first rewrite in the 1850s. And change is the clearest sign that the musical is still a living, growing genre.

Will we ever return to the so-called ‘golden age’, with musicals at the center of popular culture? Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume 8: Genres: North America. The American Musical, Part 2, PBS. These may include electric guitar, electric bass synthesizer and drum kit. Show index with links to orchestration information Archived 2010-02-13 at the Wayback Machine, MTIshows. Off the Stage, What’s Behind the Music». A Wonderful Life», Theatre Under the Stars, Houston, Texas, p. Gilbert and American Musical Theatre», pp.

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33, American Popular Music: Readings from the Popular Press by Timothy E. Meyerson, Harold and Ernest Harburg Who Put the Rainbow in the Wizard of Oz? Mark Evan Swartz’s Oz Before the Rainbow describes the enormous train trips required of the cast of the 1903 smash hit, The Wizard of Oz, which tour ran for nine years, including on the road. See, generally, Index to The Gaiety, a British musical theatre publication about Victorian and Edwardian musical theatre. Basil Hood, Who’s Who in Musicals: Additional Bios XII, Musicals101. Traditionalist», The Musical Quarterly, 1985, Vol.

Salad Days History, Story, Roles and Musical Numbers» guidetomusicaltheatre. Pretty Woman: The Musical is transferring to the Savoy Theatre from 8 July. West End tickets for Pretty Woman: The Musical at the Savoy Theatre are on sale now. Based on the classic film starring Julia Roberts and Richard Gere, Pretty Woman tells the story of Vivian Ward who is hired by a rich businessman called Edward Lewis to escort him to a number of events during his stay in the city. Through spending time together, their relationship develops as they get to know each other better. Pretty Woman was at the Piccadilly Theatre from 13 February — 14 Mar. Pretty Woman will now play at the Savoy Theatre from 8 Jul. 2021, starring Aimie Atkinson and Danny Mac.

This musical adaptation of the film opened on Broadway in 2018 at the Nederlander Theatre in New York, starring Andy Karl and Samantha Barks. Mac succeeds in having plenty of charm, has a perfect combination of quirky vulnerability and the strength of a survivor. Pretty Woman is at the Savoy Theatre in London from July 2021. BOOK WITH CONFIDENCE You can book with complete confidence knowing that if you have any issues, your tickets can be exchanged. Based on the classic film starring Julia Roberts and Richard Gere, Pretty Woman tells the story of Vivian Ward after she is hired by a rich businessman called Edward Lewis to escort him to a number of events during his stay in the city. There have been plenty of musicals about prostitution on Broadway, like the 60s classic Sweet Charity, set in a dance hall where the hostesses available for hire as dance companions say, «Who dances? We defend ourselves to music» and The Life, a 1997 show that portrayed a gritty, pre-Disneyfied Times Square and the hard realities of street sexual exploitation and its affiliations with drug interests. The West End production of Pretty Woman: The Musical will continue its run this summer, transferring to the Savoy Theatre.

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Performances will resume from 8 July at the Savoy Theatre, with Pretty Woman: The Musical tickets now on sale. Our London production of Pretty Woman: The Musical had just opened when the world changed and our cherished theatres were forced to close due to the pandemic. Ahead of the West End premiere of Pretty Woman: The Musical next month at the Piccadilly Theatre, the show’s full cast has been named. They will join the previously announced Aimie Atkinson as Vivian Ward and Danny Mac as Edward Lewis in the stage adaptation of the classic 1990s romcom. Walking down the street’ and into the West End, Pretty Woman: The Musical opened at the Piccadilly Theatre in 2020. Now, Pretty Woman: The Musical is transferring to the Savoy Theatre, with performances from 8 Jul. Based on the 1990 film of the same name starring Julia Roberts and Richard Gere, the stage adaptation of the romantic comedy received its Broadway premiere last year.

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Following the previous announcement that Pretty Woman: The Musical will receive its West End premiere next year, it has been confirmed that the production will open at the Piccadilly Theatre in February 2020. Sign up to our mailing list to receive exclusive offers, new show ticket alerts and seasonal promotions. You can unsubscribe at any time by following the instructions in the footer of every email we send. Jump to navigation Jump to search This article is about traditional Western musical theatre. For the film genre, see Musical film. For the music genre, see Comedy music. The Black Crook was a hit musical in 1866.

Musical theatre is a form of theatrical performance that combines songs, spoken dialogue, acting and dance. Although music has been a part of dramatic presentations since ancient times, modern Western musical theatre emerged during the 19th century, with many structural elements established by the works of Gilbert and Sullivan in Britain and those of Harrigan and Hart in America. Musicals are performed around the world. They may be presented in large venues, such as big-budget Broadway or West End productions in New York City or London. Since the 20th century, the «book musical» has been defined as a musical play where songs and dances are fully integrated into a well-made story with serious dramatic goals that is able to evoke genuine emotions other than laughter. There is no fixed length for a musical.

Japan has recently seen the growth of an indigenous form of musical theatre, a British musical theatre publication about Victorian and Edwardian musical theatre. Where music and dance were included in stage comedies and tragedies during the 5th century BCE. Colonial America did not have a significant theatre presence until 1752, the team of P. Ahead of the West End premiere of Pretty Woman: The Musical next month at the Piccadilly Theatre, and they had little influence on later development of musical theatre. Performances will resume from 8 July at the Savoy Theatre, 27 million tickets were purchased for Broadway shows for a gross sale amount of almost a billion dollars.

Musicals are usually presented in two acts, with one short intermission, and the first act is frequently longer than the second. Moments of greatest dramatic intensity in a book musical are often performed in song. Musical theatre is closely related to the theatrical form of opera, but the two are usually distinguished by weighing a number of factors. First, musicals generally have a greater focus on spoken dialogue. Finally, musicals usually avoid certain operatic conventions. In particular, a musical is almost always performed in the language of its audience. Musicals produced on Broadway or in the West End, for instance, are invariably sung in English, even if they were originally written in another language. Like opera, the singing in musical theatre is generally accompanied by an instrumental ensemble called a pit orchestra, located in a lowered area in front of the stage. Shorter or simplified «junior» versions of many musicals are available for schools and youth groups, and very short works created or adapted for performance by children are sometimes called minimusicals. The antecedents of musical theatre in Europe can be traced back to the theatre of ancient Greece, where music and dance were included in stage comedies and tragedies during the 5th century BCE.

The music from the ancient forms is lost, however, and they had little influence on later development of musical theatre. The European Renaissance saw older forms evolve into two antecedents of musical theatre: commedia dell’arte, where raucous clowns improvised familiar stories, and later, opera buffa. Colonial America did not have a significant theatre presence until 1752, when London entrepreneur William Hallam sent a company of actors to the colonies managed by his brother Lewis. In New York in the summer of 1753, they performed ballad-operas, such as The Beggar’s Opera, and ballad-farces. Around 1850, the French composer Hervé was experimenting with a form of comic musical theatre he called opérette. In America, mid-19th century musical theatre entertainments included crude variety revue, which eventually developed into vaudeville, minstrel shows, which soon crossed the Atlantic to Britain, and Victorian burlesque, first popularized in the US by British troupes. As transportation improved, poverty in London and New York diminished, and street lighting made for safer travel at night, the number of patrons for the growing number of theatres increased enormously. Plays ran longer, leading to better profits and improved production values, and men began to bring their families to the theatre.

657 performances, but New York runs continued to be relatively short, with a few exceptions, compared with London runs, until the 1920s. Meanwhile, musicals took over the London stage in the Gay Nineties, led by producer George Edwardes, who perceived that audiences wanted a new alternative to the Savoy-style comic operas and their intellectual, political, absurdist satire. American musical to run for over a year in London. Virtually eliminated from the English-speaking stage by competition from the ubiquitous Edwardian musical comedies, operettas returned to London and Broadway in 1907 with The Merry Widow, and adaptations of continental operettas became direct competitors with musicals. In the 1910s, the team of P. These shows built and polished the mold from which almost all later major musical comedies evolved. The characters and situations were, within the limitations of musical comedy license, believable and the humor came from the situations or the nature of the characters.

Kern’s exquisitely flowing melodies were employed to further the action or develop characterization. The theatre-going public needed escapist entertainment during the dark times of World War I, and they flocked to the theatre. The 1919 hit musical Irene ran for 670 performances, a Broadway record that held until 1938. The musicals of the Roaring Twenties, borrowing from vaudeville, music hall and other light entertainments, tended to emphasize big dance routines and popular songs at the expense of plot. Princess Theatre musicals, with dramatic themes told through the music, dialogue, setting and movement. As the Great Depression set in during the post-Broadway national tour of Show Boat, the public turned back to mostly light, escapist song-and-dance entertainment. Gershwins, was the first musical awarded the Pulitzer Prize. The motion picture mounted a challenge to the stage. Silent films had presented only limited competition, but by the end of the 1920s, films like The Jazz Singer could be presented with synchronized sound. Talkie» films at low prices effectively killed off vaudeville by the early 1930s.

The 1940s would begin with more hits from Porter, Irving Berlin, Rodgers and Hart, Weill and Gershwin, some with runs over 500 performances as the economy rebounded, but artistic change was in the air. Rodgers and Hammerstein were the most important contributors to the musical-play form The examples they set in creating vital plays, often rich with social thought, provided the necessary encouragement for other gifted writers to create musical plays of their own». The show’s creativity stimulated Rodgers and Hammerstein’s contemporaries and ushered in the «Golden Age» of American musical theatre. Americana was displayed on Broadway during the «Golden Age», as the wartime cycle of shows began to arrive. The 1950s were crucial to the development of the American musical. Another record was set by The Threepenny Opera, which ran for 2,707 performances, becoming the longest-running off-Broadway musical until The Fantasticks. The production also broke ground by showing that musicals could be profitable off-Broadway in a small-scale, small orchestra format.

Romeo and Juliet to modern day New York City and converted the feuding Montague and Capulet families into opposing ethnic gangs, the Jets and the Sharks. Although directors and choreographers have had a major influence on musical theatre style since at least the 19th century, George Abbott and his collaborators and successors took a central role in integrating movement and dance fully into musical theatre productions in the Golden Age. During the Golden Age, automotive companies and other large corporations began to hire Broadway talent to write corporate musicals, private shows only seen by their employees or customers. In 1960, The Fantasticks was first produced off-Broadway. This intimate allegorical show would quietly run for over 40 years at the Sullivan Street Theatre in Greenwich Village, becoming by far the longest-running musical in history. While some critics have argued that some of Sondheim’s musicals lack commercial appeal, others have praised their lyrical sophistication and musical complexity, as well as the interplay of lyrics and music in his shows.